The Doors – Infinite on SACD

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Analogue Productions and Acoustic Sounds bring you The Doors — the band’s six Morrison-era albums, all on Hybrid Multichannel SACD, in aspecial edition box set limited to 2,500 numbered copies! Also available as 45 RPM double LPs in a box set limited to 2,500 copies. Each pressed on 200-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings!

All remastered from the original sources by Doug Sax and The Doors original engineer Bruce Botnick.

As aptly put by rock ‘n’ roll journalist extradorinare Ben Fong-Torres, there’s never been a reissue of The Doors recordings that sounded quite like these gems from Analogue Productions and Acoustic Sounds. And now, you can ‘break on through’ with all six Doors’ studio albums in a deluxe box set — on Hybrid Multichannel SACD and 45 RPM LP!

Analogue Productions, using the original master analog sources, brings The Doors to SACD, resulting in as Doors biographer Ben Fong-Torres, esteemed rock journalist and former Rolling Stone editor, notes: “Bottom line, a chronicle of The Doors in the studio, captured with the highest sonic quality possible.

“They deserve no less.”

All of The Doors’ legendary albums — The untoppable self-titled 1967 debut The Doors, one of rock’s most important debuts, Strange Days, Waiting For The Sun, The Soft Parade, Morrison Hotel, and the visceral L.A. Woman — have been remastered by Doug Sax and The Doors’ original engineer Bruce Botnick, and made available on Hybrid Multichannel SACD for the first time in the U.S.!

The surround sound program on the Doors SACDs comes from the original 96K, 24-bit files mixed and mastered by Bruce Botnick for the DVD Audio Doors/Perception release. Those mixes were made from the original one-inch, eight track, 15 i.p.s. analog master tapes. For the SACDs, the mixes were then up-sampled without filters to DSD using the Weiss Saracon format converter and authored by Gus Skinas at the Super Audio Center.

Fong-Torres helped compile one of the most definitive written histories of the band — “The Doors by The Doors.” In that book, Chester Bennington (Linkin Park) calls The Doors, “the most underrated musical powerhouse in rock history. And unlike some that fade away into the abyss, The Doors will always relate to the youth of any era.”

Girl you gotta love your man. And audiophiles, you’ll love The Doors box set on SACD from Acoustic Sounds. The memory of Morrison and Co. on you depends; their legacy will never end. Get this box set today before they’re gone; into your house The Doors will storm … Yeah!

Technical notes about the recording process by Doors producer/engineer Bruce Botnick:

“Throughout the record history of the Doors, the goal between Paul Rothchild and myself was to be invisible, as the Doors were the songwriters and performers. Our duty was to capture them in the recorded medium without bringing attention to ourselves. Of course, the Doors were very successful, and Paul and I did receive some acclaim, which we did appreciate.

“If you listen to all the Doors albums, no attempt was made to create sounds that weren’t generated by the Doors, except for the Moog Synthesizer on Strange Days, although that was played live in the mix by Jim, but that’s another story. The equipment used was very basic, mostly tube consoles and microphones. Telefunken U47, Sony C37A, Shure 56. The echo used was from real acoustic echo chambers and EMT plate reverb units. In those days, we didn’t have plug-ins or anything beyond an analogue eight-track machine. All the studios that we used, except for Elektra West, had three Altec Lansing 604E loudspeakers, as that was the standard in the industry, three-track. On EKS-74007, The Doors, we used four-track Ampex recorders and on the subsequent albums, 3M 56 eight-tracks. Dolby noise reduction units were used on two albums, Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade. Everything was analogue, digital was just a word. We didn’t use fuzz tone or other units like that but created the sounds organically, i.e. the massive dual guitar solo on “When The Music’s Over,” which was created by feeding the output of one microphone preamp into another and adjusting the level to create the distortion. The tubes were glowing and lit up the control room.

“When mastering for the 45-RPM vinyl release, we were successfully able to bake the original master tapes and play them to cut the lacquer masters.”

– Bruce Botnick, July 2012

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